Thursday, September 10, 2009
"World’s Healthiest" Food #2 that I like: Sweet Potatoes
Not all carbs are created equal. Some offer an enormous amount of filler with no real substance, and will leave you feeling unsatisfied and hungry within an hour or two. And then there are sweet potatoes. They always seem to pop up on top ten best foods lists, and their health benefits are overwhelming. An average-sized sweet potato has about 100 calories, but in those 100 calories you get incredible amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C, a good serving of fiber, B6, potassium, all sorts of good stuff that you need! Compare that with one serving of pasta. (Note: one real serving of pasta. One serving on the label is something stupid like 1/2 cup. Have you ever tried to eat just 1/2 cup of noodles? It is maybe the saddest thing ever. It’s like 12 noodles sitting on your plate looking all lonely and pitiful. To be realistic, we will say 1 cup.) In one serving of pasta, you pack away about 220 calories, don’t take in nearly the same amount of vitamins, and consume about 44 grams of carbohydrates (compared with sweet potatoes’ 23 grams). So now that you are convinced that sweet potatoes are good for you, you’re wondering if they are delicious, right?
Well, of course they are. They are one of the best things ever. All you need to do to make them awesome is bake or roast them, but there are many other ways to prepare them if that doesn’t sound interesting. They make great soup, they are good mashed, you can basically use them in any recipe that calls for either butternut squash or a regular potato. The picture above shows the way I make them most often. Preheat the oven to about 400 degrees. Cut up some sweet potatoes (I have some yukon gold potatoes thrown in there as well because I had them in the kitchen), drizzle with a little olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast! I also added a little rosemary and thyme, but that is totally optional. Roast for about 45 minutes or until you can pierce them with a fork, and you are good to go!

"World’s Healthiest" Food #2 that I like: Sweet Potatoes


Not all carbs are created equal. Some offer an enormous amount of filler with no real substance, and will leave you feeling unsatisfied and hungry within an hour or two. And then there are sweet potatoes. They always seem to pop up on top ten best foods lists, and their health benefits are overwhelming. An average-sized sweet potato has about 100 calories, but in those 100 calories you get incredible amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C, a good serving of fiber, B6, potassium, all sorts of good stuff that you need! Compare that with one serving of pasta. (Note: one real serving of pasta. One serving on the label is something stupid like 1/2 cup. Have you ever tried to eat just 1/2 cup of noodles? It is maybe the saddest thing ever. It’s like 12 noodles sitting on your plate looking all lonely and pitiful. To be realistic, we will say 1 cup.) In one serving of pasta, you pack away about 220 calories, don’t take in nearly the same amount of vitamins, and consume about 44 grams of carbohydrates (compared with sweet potatoes’ 23 grams). So now that you are convinced that sweet potatoes are good for you, you’re wondering if they are delicious, right?

Well, of course they are. They are one of the best things ever. All you need to do to make them awesome is bake or roast them, but there are many other ways to prepare them if that doesn’t sound interesting. They make great soup, they are good mashed, you can basically use them in any recipe that calls for either butternut squash or a regular potato. The picture above shows the way I make them most often. Preheat the oven to about 400 degrees. Cut up some sweet potatoes (I have some yukon gold potatoes thrown in there as well because I had them in the kitchen), drizzle with a little olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast! I also added a little rosemary and thyme, but that is totally optional. Roast for about 45 minutes or until you can pierce them with a fork, and you are good to go!

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